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Thursday, May 7, 2020 | History

1 edition of Science in nineteenth-century America found in the catalog.

Science in nineteenth-century America

Science in nineteenth-century America

a documentary history

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  • 15 Currently reading

Published by Macmillan in London .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Originally published, New York, Hill & Wang, 1964.

Statementedited and with an introduction by Nathan Reingold.
ContributionsReingold, Nathan, 1927-
The Physical Object
Pagination339p.,23cm
Number of Pages339
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17383482M

Lists about: Best Books of the 19th Century, Best American Civil War Books, The best gothic novels, ghost stories and early horror , Victorian. Topham, J. R. (). Scientific publishing and the reading of science in early nineteenth-century Britain: An historiographical survey and guide to sources. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science, 31A, – CrossRef Google ScholarCited by: 1.

Research within librarian-selected research topics on 19th Century U.S. History from the Questia online library, including full-text online books, academic journals, magazines, newspapers and . Fugitive Science chronicles a little-known story about race and science in America. While the history of scientific racism in the nineteenth century has been well-documented, there was also a counter-movement of African Americans who worked to refute its claims.

  During the first half of the nineteenth century, an era prior to the publication and popularization of natural selection as the mechanism for evolution, science—or, natural philosophy, as it was. Janet Farrell Brodie introduces this engaging pair early in a book that is certain to be the definitive study of family limitation in nineteenth-century America. She makes adroit use of Mary's diaries and letters to lift a curtain on the intimate life of a Victorian couple Cited by:


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Science in nineteenth-century America Download PDF EPUB FB2

Science in Nineteenth-Century America: A Documentary History Univ of Chicago Edition by Nathan Reingold (Editor)Format: Paperback. Science and Technology in Nineteenth-Century America (The Greenwood Press Daily Life Through History Series) Todd Timmons The 19th Century was a period of tremendous change in the daily lives of the average Americans.

Science and Technology in Nineteenth-Century America (The Greenwood Press Daily Life Through History Series: Science and Technology in Everyday Life) byCited by: 3. The book includes a timeline and a bibliography for those interested in pursuing further research, and over two dozen fascinating photos that illustrate the daily lives of Americans in.

Publisher Synopsis "A finely tuned study of the operation of science and technology in shaping the every day life of 19th century Americans.

ISBN: OCLC Number: Description: xii, p. illus. 21 cm. Contents: Introduction --Two grand old men --The world of the natural historians --The geophysical tradition I: the alliance of physics and geography --The Wilkes expedition --The geophysical tradition II: Henry, Bache, and their circle --Evolution: from natural history to.

In the nineteenth century, Americans began to use maps in radically new ways. For the first time, medical men mapped diseases to understand and prevent epidemics, natural scientists mapped climate and rainfall to uncover weather patterns, educators mapped the past to foster national loyalty among students, and Northerners mapped slavery to assess the power of the South.

This important exploration of the major nineteenth-century pseudo-sciences provides fresh perspectives on the American society of that era and on the history of the orthodox sciences, a number of which grew out of the fertile soil plowed by the by: 1.

Science in Nineteenth-Century Literature The nineteenth century was a period of many advances in the field of science and medicine. Society placed a great deal of emphasis on the empirical.

Part One: Science in the 19th Century During the 19th century science made great progress. John Dalton() published his atomic theory in According to the theory matter is made of tiny, indivisible particles. Science in nineteenth-century America.

New York: Octagon Books,© (OCoLC) Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Nathan Reingold. Summary: Documents, many of them private correspondence or memoirs previously unpublished.

Attempts to find the seed of the position of American science in. Thomas Broman, Journal of the History of Medicine "Science and the Practice of Medicine in the Nineteenth Century is a text that is highly recommended as an introduction to history of medicine for undergraduates.

It should also be read by all historians of medicine for its thoughtful and original analysis of a major historiographical issue."Cited by: Get this from a library. Science in nineteenth-century America: a documentary history. [Nathan Reingold;] -- Combining well-chosen correspondence of scientists with historical commentary, Reingold brings to life the developing American scientific community of the nineteenth century.

"The reader catches. As a result, book-sized computers of today can outperform room-sized computers of the s, and there has been a revolution in the way people live – in how they work, study, conduct business, and engage in research.

World War II had a profound impact on the development of science and technology in the United States. Beginning with the discovery of photographs of seven South Carolinian slaves taken during the s in the attic of Harvard's Peabody Museum inMolly Roger's beautifully scripted book, Delia's Tears: Race, Science and Photography in Nineteenth Century America, skilfully weaves together the complicated issues of race, science, photography, and politics that allowed Cited by:   'It has been said by its opponents that science divorces itself from literature; but the statement, like so many others, arises from lack of knowledge.' John Tyndall, Although we are used to thinking of science and the humanities as separate disciplines, in the nineteenth century that division was not recognized.

As the scientist John Tyndall pointed out, not only were science. The conduct book in its nineteenth century American form is part of what was called the prescriptive literature, also known as advice books. More particularly, conduct books are part of the behavioural books.

Other manuals belonging to prescriptive literature are for instance the etiquette manual, the courtesy book, Size: KB. Science and Technology in Nineteenth-Century America chronicles this relationship between science and technology and the revolutions in the lives of everyday Americans. The volume includes a discussion of: Transportation—from the railroad and steamship to the first automobiles appearing near the end of the century.

Science and Technology in Nineteenth-Century America chronicles this relationship between science and technology and the revolutions in the lives of everyday Americans.

The volume includes a discussion of: Transportation-from the railroad and steamship to the first automobiles appearing near the end of the : Todd Timmons. Among the most influential ideas of the 19th century were those of Charles Darwin (alongside the independent researches of Alfred Russel Wallace), who in published the book The Origin of Species, which introduced the idea of evolution by natural selection.

Weaving together the histories of race, science, and photography in nineteenth-century America, Rogers explores the invention and uses of photography, the scientific theories the images were intended to support and how these related to the race politics of the time, the meanings that may have been found in the photographs, and the possible.— Peter Coviello, author of Tomorrow’s Parties: Sex and the Untimely in Nineteenth-Century America "With scintillating attention to a telling archive, Kyla Schuller has taken nineteenth-century sentimentalism toward a set of critical consequences within the realm of biopower at large, speaking to a wide range of readers from science studies to critical race, feminist, affect.